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Press Room


Learn more about NACCHO and check out the top media coverage on local health departments with these resources:
 
In the Spotlight
NACCHO President Heise
NACCHO President, Georgia Heise, Urges Policymakers to Confront Heroin, Opioid Epidemic

There is a new normal in our communities. For some children, stumbling across used, dirty needles at the park is more common than a pick-up game. Heroin addiction is a big disease with an even bigger negative impact on everyone. Read NACCHO President, Georgia Heise's opinion editorial on the subject, which appeared in the Courier- Journal on August 26, 2014.

In the op-ed Heise urges policymakers to use their leadership to influence public health policies that expand and strengthen prevention for prescription drug abuse, misuse and overdose, and provide funding for local health departments or their system partners to respond to the rising tide of heroin abuse and overdose. More»



 
2014 NACCHO Annual Conference
NACCHO Annual_2014

NACCHO honored the outstanding efforts and accomplishments of local health departments and public health leaders from across the country at an awards ceremony at NACCHO Annual. More»

 

Pictured Left: Winner, Local Health Department of the Year (Large), Chicago Public Health Department

 
NACCHO Receives FDA Award for Strengthening the Local Health Department Role in Retail Food Safety
NACCHO_FDA_AWARD

On June 6th, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration awarded NACCHO its FDA Group Recognition Award for NACCHO's role in establishing and sustaining a Mentorship Program that allows a cohort of local health department leaders to learn about, share experiences, and develop tools and resources to handle food regulatory standards, and pass that learning on to their peers in other communities. More»

 
NACCHO Commends EPA and Calls for Swift Action to Address Climate Change Impact on Public Health
EPAlogo

NACCHO supports regulations announced on June 2nd by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that aim to reduce carbon emissions from existing power plants. These emissions make strides to decrease carbon pollution—which scientists cite as a primary cause of dangerous climate change that impacts human health—and reduce pollutants that can cause asthma attacks, heart attacks, cancer, birth defects and premature death.  More »