Hepatitis C Virus

More than 3.5 million Americans are living with hepatitis C virus (HCV), making it the most common chronic blood-borne infection in the United States. Chronic HCV infection is a leading cause of liver failure, liver cancer, and liver transplantation. Baby boomers (those born between 1945 and 1965) are six times more likely to be infected with HCV than those in other age groups, however a surge in new infections is being seen among young people who inject drugs. This is primarily a result of increasing injection drug use associated with America’s growing opioid epidemic. Additionally, there are growing rates of sexual transmission among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

Local health departments are on the frontlines of addressing the HCV continuum from prevention to cure, and moving the United States closer to the goal of eliminating viral hepatitis as a public health threat by 2030. NACCHO supports the role of local health departments in achieving elimination goals through capacity building, guidance, and advocacy.  

Community Health

Hepatitis C and Local Health Departments Educational Series

HCV is the most common chronic blood borne infection in the US. Take this course to learn more.

Community Health

Hepatitis C and Local Health Departments Educational Series

Community Health

Hepatitis C Provider Detailing Kit

Resources to help local health departments educate providers on testing, treating & linking to care.

Community Health

Hepatitis C Provider Detailing Kit

Community Health

Local Health Departments Aim to Curb Rising Hepatitis Rates

Press release on local public health efforts to curb increases in hepatitis B and C.

Community Health

Local Health Departments Aim to Curb Rising Hepatitis Rates