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Resources


 
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CDC Public Health Law Program
Law is a foundational public health tool for disease prevention and health promotion. For many traditional public health problems, both acute and chronic, the role of law has been crucial in attaining public health goals, both framing and complementing the roles of epidemiology and laboratory science. Many of the greatest successes claimed by public health, such as high childhood immunization rates, improved motor vehicle safety, safer workplaces, and reduced tooth decay, have relied heavily on law. Recently, law has played a fundamental role in the control and prevention of emerging health problems such as SARS and the threat of pandemic influenza. More »
 
 
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Public Health Law Research
Public Health Law Research, a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation® program at Temple University, is a national initiative to  promote effective regulatory, legal and policy solutions to improve public health. More »
 
 
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Network for Public Health Law
The Network for Public Health Law connects and serves individuals and organizations committed to applying the law to improve public health. Working with and for public health practitioners; local, tribal, state and federal officials; lawyers; policy-makers and public health advocates, the Network delivers:

  • Innovative legal technical assistance
  • Training materials and programs on public health law
  • Connections among the public health law field
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Advancing Public Health Practice and Policy Solutions
Components of Local Ordinances to Protect and Promote the Public’s Health More »
 
 
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Advancing Public Health Practice and Policy Solutions
Survey Synopsis: Developing and Enacting Municipal Public Health Ordinances. More »
 
 
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Frequently Asked Questions about Federal Public Health Emergency Law
Based on the April 28, 2009, teleconference “Federal Public Health Emergency Law: Implications for State & Local Preparedness and Response,” and prepared by the Public Health Law Program Centers for Disease Control and Prevention More »