HIV Prevention and Care

Thanks to targeted high-impact prevention efforts, HIV infections in the U.S. are declining. However, progress in reducing HIV transmission and HIV-related deaths is uneven. Several groups - including men who have sex with men, youth, cisgender and transgender women, and people who inject drugs - continue to experience rising rates. To address this, NACCHO is engaged in several efforts to help local health departments serve communities so that new HIV infections can decrease for all people and care will be available across the HIV care continuum.

Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a safe and effective biomedical prevention strategy in which HIV-negative individuals take daily antiretroviral medications to reduce their risk of HIV infection by over 90 percent. In spite of this effectiveness – and with medication on the market and clinical guidelines in place – access to PrEP remains limited as a result of provider resistance; lack of patient and provider education on PrEP; stigma; and cost. To help local health departments overcome these challenges, NACCHO has developed resources to strengthen local capacity to increase provider understanding of and community access to PrEP. 

Community Health

PrEP and Local Health Departments Educational Series

Pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is an HIV prevention strategy.

Community Health

PrEP and Local Health Departments Educational Series

Community Health

PrEP Story Bank

Communities across the United States are at varying stages of PrEP awareness and implementation.

Community Health

PrEP Story Bank

The Southern U.S. bears a disproportionate burden – over 50% – of newly diagnosed cases of HIV. The Southern Initiative provides funding and technical assistance to implement innovative and evidence-based/informed interventions and service delivery models that improve outcomes across the HIV care continuum and reduce disparities among the most affected groups, including men who have sex with men, youth, cisgender and transgender women, and people who inject drugs.