Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health

Local health departments (LHDs) play an important role in coordinating the broader public health system’s efforts to improve the health of women, children and adolescents. NACCHO’s Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health (MCAH) Program strengthens the capacity of LHDs to effectively ensure and assess the health of women, children and adolescents by providing learning opportunities, developing tools and resources, providing technical support, and facilitating peer exchange.

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Improving Indoor Air Quality in Schools – Resource...

These resources can help LHD staff understand where to begin when it comes to...

Jul 29, 2022 | Angana Roy

Improving Indoor Air Quality in Schools – Resource...

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Together We Can Do Great Things: NACCHO celebrates...

The solid evidence of short- and long-term medical and neurodevelopmental...

Jul 28, 2022 | Erika Ennis, Sarah Robinson

Together We Can Do Great Things: NACCHO celebrates...

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Building Community Resilience Through Maternal Child...

NACCHO, with support from CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health, launched a...

Jul 07, 2022 | Elana Filipos

Building Community Resilience Through Maternal Child...

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A COVID-19 Hotwash with Local Health Department...

NACCHO invited LHD directors and staff to provide insight into their health...

Jul 07, 2022 | Hitomi Abe

A COVID-19 Hotwash with Local Health Department...

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NACCHO Statement on U.S. Supreme Court Decision on Dobbs...

Today, the U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision on Dobbs v. Jackson...

Jun 24, 2022 | Adriane Casalotti

NACCHO Statement on U.S. Supreme Court Decision on Dobbs...

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NACCHO Responds to Current National Infant Formula...

NACCHO is continuing to closely monitor the infant formula shortage that is...

Jun 08, 2022 | Elana Filipos

NACCHO Responds to Current National Infant Formula...

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Updated Operational Guidance for K-12 School and Early...

CDC has released updated Operational Guidance for K-12 School and Early Care...

May 27, 2022 | Beth Hess

Updated Operational Guidance for K-12 School and Early...

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Webinar: Building Community Resilience through Maternal...

Join this webinar on Thursday, June 16, 2:00-3:00 PM ET.

May 02, 2022 | Emily Boyle, Hitomi Abe

Webinar: Building Community Resilience through Maternal...

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Adolescent Immunization Action Week Gears up to Get...

The first annual National Adolescent Immunization Action Week (#AIAW22) is...

Apr 01, 2022 | Robin Mowson

Adolescent Immunization Action Week Gears up to Get...

Preventing the spread of COVID-19 among children in early care and education (ECE) programs is critical, particularly as many are too young to wear masks and vaccination has not been approved for their age group. Because child care programs typically operate independently, they often do not have the resources or partnerships to implement best public health practices. COVID-19 has highlighted the need to strengthen the partnership between LHDs and ECE providers to establish and sustain collaborative mitigation efforts and to prevent other infectious disease outbreaks and support other infectious diseases, immunization, chronic disease prevention, and other public health goals for young children. This project, funded through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is a collaboration between NACCHO, Pennsylvania State University’s Better Kid Care, and Child Care Aware of America, and will result in training materials and resources to address the COVID-19 response in ECE.

NACCHO, in partnership with Child Care Aware of America and with funding from CDC, developed a COVID-19 checklist to support ECE and Child Care programs in providing a healthy and safe environment for providers, children, and families during this challenging time.

View the full COVID-19 ECE Checklist for ECE programs here. To download a section of the checklist, please select from below.

Section 1: Planning and Preparing

Section 2: Screening, Illness, and Communicating Symptoms & Cases

Section 3: Masks, Hygiene, and other Personal Protective Measures

Section 4: Classes/Cohorts and Physical Distancing

Section 5: Cleaning and Disinfecting

Section 6: Immunizations

Section 7: Staff Resilience and Support

For more information, please contact William Rowe (wrowe@naccho.org).

The period from birth until a child’s second birthday is critical for proper development, and for establishing healthy dietary patterns that may influence health throughout the life course. Human milk is the ideal first food as it is uniquely suited for infants’ optimal growth, and it also has a substantial impact on the birthing persons’ health, which makes chest/breastfeeding support critical for improving community health. Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended until 6 months of age, with appropriate introduction of nutrient-dense complementary foods. Many families discontinue chest/breastfeeding prematurely due to many reasons that could be solved with continuity of care in chest/breastfeeding support through the 1,000 days within communities. Moreover, significant breastfeeding and infant/toddler healthy feeding disparities persist by race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography. The Reducing Breastfeeding Disparities through Continuity of Care project, funded through CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, aims to improve local approaches to chest/breastfeeding protection, promotion, and support through the advancement of continuity of care in optimal infant and toddler feeding.

Through training webinars, ongoing technical assistance, and dissemination of resources, NACCHO shares lessons learned and effective strategies for local-level implementation. NACCHO also provides technical assistance to CDC’s Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health (REACH) recipients on lactation support and continuity of care. For more information about NACCHO’s chest/breastfeeding work, please visit here.

NACCHO has recently launched the Continuity of Care in Breastfeeding Support: A Blueprint for Communities, and an online repository of CoC resources. Visit here to learn more.

For more information about this project, please contact breastfeeding@naccho.org.

NACCHO’s Building Community Resilience through Maternal Child Health and Emergency Preparedness Collaboration project, funded through CDC’s Division of Reproductive Health, has awarded Jefferson County Public Health, CO; Louisiana Office of Public Health, LA; Tri-County Health Department, MO; and Western Peninsula Health Department, MI, with up to $20,000 each to support their local health departments build community resilience and improve the lives of pregnant people, birth parents, and their infants by strengthening partnerships between maternal and child health (MCH) and emergency preparedness (EPR) programs within local health departments. The 4 awarded health departments will receive facilitated virtual action planning processes using MAPP principles that enables them to develop or improve relationships among MCH and EPR staff, identify shared goals, include priorities and considerations for Women of Reproductive Age (WRA) in EPR plans, and develop and implement joint action plans to effectively integrate WRA into preparedness plans and exercises and ultimately improving community resilience. To learn more about each of the awarded LHDs, please read the press release here.

For questions about this project, please contact Hitomi Abe at habe@naccho.org.

NACCHO’s Bridging Preparedness, Infectious Disease (ID), Maternal-Child Health (MCH) and Birth Defects within Cities and Counties project, funded through CDC’s National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, supports public health and clinical care partnerships at the local level to increase local jurisdictions’ ability to protect, respond, and support pregnant people and their infants from emerging threats. To support these efforts, NACCHO convenes the MIP collaborative workgroup, which is comprised of local health department officials and health department staff with expertise and interest in the intersectionality of preparedness, infectious disease, maternal-child health, and/or birth defects. The goals of the MIP workgroup are to identify variations, gaps, and promising practices in coordinating response and surveillance of the impact of infectious diseases on pregnant people and infants among preparedness, ID, MCH, and birth defects programs; identify and design tools to support city and county health departments with responding to and managing the impact infectious disease on MCH populations and draw from lessons learned in previous infectious disease preparedness practices.

For more information about this project, please contact Hitomi Abe at habe@naccho.org.

PRISM is a technical assistance and peer-learning initiative to assist maternal and child health (MCH) leaders and Title V staff in building their capacity to develop and implement state-level policy solutions that address substance misuse and mental health disorders in reproductive-aged people. The U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau awarded PRISM cooperative agreements to four organizations, including the Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs (AMCHP).

With funding from AMCHP, NACCHO builds the capacity of Title V to advance state-level policy solutions to improve access to mental health and substance use services for reproductive-age people. NACCHO provides the local public health perspective on effective approaches to address health care access barriers for MCH populations, including those with culturally, linguistically, social-economically and geographically diverse backgrounds.

NACCHO receives funding from CDC’s Division of Violence Prevention to address the impact of systemic racism and violence on children and youth in Baltimore, MD. In partnership with the Baltimore City Health Department and the University of Maryland School of Social Work, NACCHO aims to identify racial disparities in experiences of trauma within Baltimore City, establish a data-sharing system in Baltimore City child- and youth-serving agencies to improve coordination and delivery of trauma-informed services and develop a comprehensive plan for referring children and youth who have experienced trauma to behavioral health services.

For more information about this project, please contact Audrey Eisemann at aeisemann@naccho.org.

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